Wednesday, November 07, 2007

TCOO Ch. 36

Mariel has worked especially hard on written (typed) narrations this term. She has been retelling This Country of Ours chapters on the individual colonies of the United States. Today she finished this one on New Amsterdam (New York), and I think it is her very best so far, so I promised to post it on the blog. I hope you enjoy it!

TCOO cha.36

The change of Governors was not a happy change. Stuyvesant acted as though he was a king!! He shouted commands out to the people, and they were scared of what might happen to them if they didn’t obey. Stuyvesant was a tyrant*. There was a man who even dared to write to Holland! But when Stuyvesant heard about it, he foamed at the mouth! Can you imagine? He should have been put on the next boat to Holland, or London! But with all of his faults, he was a much better governor than the last one. He was Dutch, so he soon got mixed up in the Henry Hudson river thing. The Dutch said that both sides of the river belonged to them. The Swedes just laughed and hoisted their flag and sailed down the river-and then said that they would do it again too! Then the Dutch built a fort and the Swedes tore it down! Stuyvesant then &there decided that they went too far, and he gathered 600men, the largest number of men together and he beat the Swedes! Hooray!

4 comments:

G.L.H. said...

Lovely! I have a great picture in my mind now...

Barbara

lindafay said...

She did a wonderful job!

Willa said...

I loved the detail and the spirited way Triss wrote. I also enjoyed her freewrite on her blog. Thanks for posting them!

Mother Auma said...

Thanks for your kind comments, ladies! That's an encouragement for Mariel and Triss.

I've been reading The Writer's Jungle by Julie Bogart and it reminded me to tell the kids what I like about their writing. She talks the element of surprise being a quality found in good writing, and I see that in both Mariel and Triss' narrations, so I made sure to tell them this past week. I get concerned with helping them realize they aren't "all that" that I forget to give encouragement sometimes. The Writer's Jungle is reminding me that we have to impart the vision to our kids-- gifts and skills we see that will most likely blossom and grow in the future. How to do that without giving them swelled heads, I wonder?