Monday, November 12, 2007

Robinson Crusoe

Robinson Crusoe

Mariel used the picture on the cover of Sister Wendy's Story of Painting to help her envision this close-up portrait of Robinson Crusoe soon after he is shipwrecked.

Her exam narration on the story thus far:

Robinson Crusoe ended up on this island because he didn’t listen to his parents. His parents said, stay in England, but he didn’t listen to them and he ended up as a slave to the Medes[Oops, it’s actually the Moors], I think it was, and he escaped with a little boy named Xury. They got away on a boat and they went up until they came to Africa, and they killed some animals there, and the people on the shore gave them the meat of the animals, but one of them was fit for nothing and so they threw it overboard. Then they saw a Portuguese ship and they fired a distress signal and the captain let them in and he wanted to keep Xury and the boat and everything that Robinson Crusoe had on it, and Robinson Crusoe consented and they went to the Brazils and there at the Brazils Robinson Crusoe bought a plantation, but it didn’t go that well, but he thought to himself, “At least I’m not on a desert island!” And that exactly came to him! Because he was going to make his fortune and he got shipwrecked on a desert island, but he managed to get lots and lots of things off of the ship before it sank, and he’s been on there (where we are) for over a year, almost. And he hasn’t met Friday yet.

4 comments:

JacciM said...

I have question, if you don't mind. When you asked her for this exam narration, did you pose a specific directive, like "Tell how Crusoe came to be on the island" or do you just ask her to tell you anything she wants about the book. I've noticed in some of the appendices to CM's books, she lists specific exam "leads" for narrations. I know many CM homeschoolers just ask for a general telling back, though. Would you please tell me a little more?

Thanks!

Mother Auma said...

Jacci, that's a good question. My specific request was, "Tell me about Robinson Crusoe's adventures so far." Then Mariel asked if she had to go all the way back to the beginning of the book or could she start at the time he was shipwrecked? Sensing that she might get overwhelmed, I said, "You can just tell me about his time on the island so far." This apparently gave her enough freedom of mind to be able to go back all the way to the beginning with a very general summary, and then be a little more detailed about the island.

This is my child who used to get very tense if I asked, for instance, "Tell me the story of Beauty and the Beast," so I learned quickly to phrase it "Tell me *about* the story of Beauty and the Beast." The "about" made her feel less like she had to give every detail.

The drawing was completely voluntary, but she did that several weeks ago during a regular reading-and-narration time.

JacciM said...

Thanks! That does help :) I've been trying to pay attention to my narration "phraseology", too. I can tell that my daughters feels some sort of pressure, as you said, to remember every tiny detail. Other times, though, she just narrates like it's no big deal. I'm trying to discern what makes the difference for her. I think it has something to do with how relationally I introduce the narration. I can say the exact same thing in a friendly, chatty way or in a "now it is time to narrate, child" sort of way and her response definitely is more positive with the former. Whose wouldn't be? :) She's doing well, though, for just starting out. I appreciate the extra info, Mother Auma :) Thanks!

Mother Auma said...

As I have gone back and reread Mariel's narration, I realize it is general summary from start to finish, and not more detailed at the end as I had originally thought. Silly me.

I think you have it when you talk about asking for a narration in a friendly way. The more casually I request things, the more the kids give me, as a general rule. I have to guard against the "Me, teacher! You, student!" mentality, especially when asking for narrations!